Museums and exhibition spaces are going digital to win the battle for attention. DR
The miracles of art and tech | épisode № 07

In a world saturated with infinite content, museums are using digital innovation to reinvent themselves

Interactive, immersive, playful, museums and exhibition spaces are going digital to win the battle for attention. But these technologies are not only spectacular, they transform access to art and knowledge and inspire new ways of creation.

In the 1980s, Sarah Kenderdine's job was to dive on junk wrecks in the Indian Ocean. As an underwater archaeologist for the Western Australia Maritime Museum in Fremantle, Australia, this daughter of a New Zealand Trade Commissioner cultivated a longstanding passion for the expansion of Buddhism across the seas via trade routes. Next May, the now Swiss Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL) professor of experimental museology will present her “Atlas of Maritime Buddhism” at Fo Guan Shan Monastery in Taiwan, the largest museum in the world dedicated to the religion with 10 million visitors per year.

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A globe-trotting lover of field work, EPFL’s professor Sarah Kenderdine has constantly developed image capture systems. DR

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